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2 edition of Effect of prestain on the release rate of copper, chromium, and arsenic from western hemlock found in the catalog.

Effect of prestain on the release rate of copper, chromium, and arsenic from western hemlock

Stan T. Lebow

Effect of prestain on the release rate of copper, chromium, and arsenic from western hemlock

by Stan T. Lebow

  • 101 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wood preservatives -- Absorption and adsorption.,
  • Stains and staining.,
  • Western hemlock -- Preservation.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementStan T. Lebow, James W. Evans.
    SeriesResearch note FPL -- RN-0271., Research note FPL -- 0271.
    ContributionsEvans, James W., Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17702265M

    Pressure Treated Wood The term treated wood refers to wood that has been pressure treated with a chemical known as chromated copper arsenate (CCA). CCA is an inorganic arsenic pesticide that protects wood from fungi, mold, dry rot, termites, and other pests. Copper, Chromium and Arsenic (CCA) Treated Timber Page 1 1 Terms of Reference The objective is to produce a report that: (1) reviews the report Release of Total Chromium, Chromium VI and Total Arsenic from New and Aged Pressure Treated Lumber by Dr R Maas et al. () to provide guidance as to its scientific credibility, the extent to which it constitutes newFile Size: KB.

    For example, the presence of chromium and copper may alter the health impacts of the arsenic, such as absorption, retention and excretion (US EPA, ). Also some people are more sensitive to chemicals than others (Buckland, ). Keywords: arsenic, chromium, copper, critical limits, critical loads, Europe, heavy metals, nickel, selenium, zinc ISSN This report can be ordered by paying € 15,- to bank account number 36 70 54 by name of Alterra Wageningen, IBAN number NL 83 RABO 70 54 , Swift number RABO2u nl. Please refer to Alterra-rapport Cited by: 2.

    the biological importance of copper. The present review includes literature for the period although a number of earlier works are included and, where appropriate, a few appearing early in have been used. Many of the earlier references are from eastern Europe and Asia because this literature takes time to appear in. the sinter compositions to test the effect of copper, sulfur, antimony and arsenic, respectively. Silver contents in all the samples were between and g/t. Table 1 Sinter compositions to evaluate effect of copper Sample No. w(S)/% w(Cu)/% w(As)/% w(Sb)/% 1 2 .


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Effect of prestain on the release rate of copper, chromium, and arsenic from western hemlock by Stan T. Lebow Download PDF EPUB FB2

Effect of Prestain on the Release Rate of Copper, Chromium, and Arsenic From Western Hemlock Stan T. Lebow, Research Forest Products Technologist James W. Evans, Supervisory Mathematical Statistician Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin Introduction The use of wood treated with chromated copper arsenate.

Get this from a library. Effect of prestain on the release rate of copper, chromium, and arsenic from western hemlock. [Stan T Lebow; James W Evans; Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)]. Effect of Prestain on the Treatability of Western Hemlock With Chromated Copper Arsenate Stan T.

Lebow, Forest Products Technologist Steven A. Halverson, Physical Science Technician Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin Introduction The use of wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA-C) has increased rapidly during the past two.

Copper chrome arsenate (CCA) treated timber is wood that has been treated with a preservative containing copper, chromium and and arsenic from western hemlock book. CCA treatment prolongs the life of the wood. This is why, in the past, CCA treated timber was commonly used in decking, playground equipment, fences, retaining walls, jetties and vineyards.

The percentage of copper, chromium, and arsenic released from treated wood blocks after 10 days leaching using distilled water, tap water, sea water, and 1% humic acid is shown in Table water leaching caused significantly less copper, chromium, and arsenic losses from treated wood blocks at both low and high retention levels compared to other leaching media by: Release rates of copper and arsenic were somewhat less from the wood treated to 20 kg/m3 than from the wood treated to 40 kg/m3, but retention had little effect on the rate of chromium release.

The application of prestain prior to CCA-C treatment did appear to reduce the release rate of arsenic from the treated and arsenic from western hemlock book by approximately 20 to 30 percent. Most of the decrease in leaching appeared to occur early in the test, during the time when arsenic release was greatest.

A preliminary study of a wide range of copper-chrome-arsenic formulations indicates that the most offective are in the region, CuSO45H2O to 45 per cent; K2Cr2O per cent and above; As2O52H2O to 15 per cent or less. Effectiveness appears to depend more on the copper content than the copper-arsenic.

Observations on selective absorption and leaching suggest that the Cited by: In this study, we investigated the effect of compression wood on the release rate of chromium, copper, and arsenic elements from red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) and the rate of fixation of.

The rate of release for these elements decreased between 05 and 2 orders of magnitude following 90 days leaching. Long-term (90 day) Cu and Cr leaching rates were highest in wood where CCA-C retention levels were >35 kg m −3.

In contrast, long-term As leaching rates increased in wood where CCA-C retention levels were Cited by: Environmental Medicine: Integrating a Missing Element into Medical Education.

Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / The combined effect of arsenic V, chromium, and copper exposure in the human is unknown and needs further study. We were unable to show changes in EMG and nerve conduction studies (on the father. Arsenical bronze is an alloy in which arsenic, as opposed to or in addition to tin or other constituent metals, is added to copper to make use of arsenic with copper, either as the secondary constituent or with another component such as tin, results in a stronger final product and better casting behavior.

Copper ore is often naturally contaminated with arsenic; hence, the term. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a wood preservative containing compounds of chromium, copper, and arsenic, in various is used to impregnate timber and other wood products, especially those intended for outdoor use, in order to protect them from attack by microbes and other copper-based wood preservatives, it imparts a greenish tint to treated timber.

Arsenic is the main impurity present in copper concentrates, and is predicted to be above penalty limits in 10% of all copper concentrates produced in The arsenic content in copper concentrates is expected to grow from ~80, tonnes/year into ~, tonnes/year in.

concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic. The American Wood Preservers’ Associ-ation (AWPA) [18] has designated these formulations as CCA Types A–C. The most widely used of the three is CCA Type C, containing % chromium as CrO3, % copper as CuO, and % arsenic as As2O5.

Another difference in the types of CCA-treated wood. Copper concentrates recently tested for mineralogy both measured about percent arsenic content.

This is above typical levels where penalties occur. Tennantite and enargite as well as Freibergite are copper arsenic sulphide minerals that respond to flotation in a similar manner to other copper sulphides.

hromated copper arsenate (CCA) is an inorganic ar-senical (composed of arsenic, chromium and copper) that is used as a wood preservative. In Februarythe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a voluntary phase-out by industry of most residential uses of this arsenic-based wood preservative.

The agreement states that be-File Size: 77KB. A variation of the usual plan of purifying copper by scorification is described by Dr. Peters as follows: “ The addition of 3 to 5 per cent, of pure white metal—subsulphide of copper—to the bath at the beginning of the refining operation has a most rapid and satisfactory effect in.

CCA stands for Cuivre, Chrome, Arsenic (French: Copper, Chromium, Arsenic; lumber treatment) Suggest new definition This definition appears somewhat frequently and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories. Station of New Haven, Conn. found elevated levels of copper, chromium and arsenic in soil samples under seven wood decks built with CCA -treated wood.” 2 Burning of the wood also releases these tox ins in the smoke and the wood ash is even moreFile Size: KB.

12 DIETARY REFERENCE INTAKES TABLE S-3 Criteria and Dietary Reference Intake Values for Chromium by Life Stage Group AI (µg/d Life Stage Group Criterion Male ⠥ 0 through 6 mo Average chromium intake from human milk ⠥ 7 through 12 mo Average chromium intake from human milk and complementary foods ⠥ 1 through 3y.Arsenic was found to leach at a higher rate ( mg in 1 year for low retention) than chromium and copper (Cited by: Concentrations of Cu, Cr, and As in soils surrounding 26 Douglas Fir Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated utility poles and in rainwater runoff from a new CCA treated utility pole segment (log) suspended outside in a cylinder were studied.

The age of the utility poles, distances from the poles, rainfall amounts, and characteristics of soil samples including cation exchange capacity (CEC Cited by: 3.